State Capital Briefs: Monday, November 13, 2017
STATE CAPITAL BRIEFS (AFTERNOON EDITION): MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2017
THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

©2017 The News Service of Florida. All rights reserved. Posting or forwarding this material without permission is prohibited. You can view the Terms of Use on our website.

SCOTT COMMITTEE SPENDS MORE THAN $1.2 MILLION ON ADS
Gov. Rick Scott's “Let's Get to Work” political committee spent more than $1.2 million in October on advertising, amid widespread speculation that Scott will run for U.S. Senate next year. The committee, which has played a key political role for Scott, spent $1,281,290 last month, with $1,229,813 listed as going toward advertising, according to a new filing with the state Division of Elections. The advertising money was paid to the Maryland firm OnMessage, Inc. Let's Get to Work raised only $500 during October, with the money coming from former state Rep. Michelle Rehwinkel Vasilinda, the report shows. Let's Get to Work had about $1.5 million in cash on hand as of Oct. 31.

SCOTT BACKS FREE TUITION FOR FAMILIES OF FALLEN OFFICERS, SOLDIERS
Gov. Rick Scott said Monday he supports a proposed constitutional amendment that would waive higher-education tuition and fees for family members of first responders, law-enforcement officers and active-duty military members who are killed in the line of duty. The proposal has been filed in the Florida Constitution Revision Commission, a panel that meets every 20 years and has the authority to put measures on the 2018 ballot. The commission in the coming months will whittle a long list of proposals before deciding which issues should go before voters. The higher-education proposal (Proposal 49) would apply to children and spouses of fallen firefighters, paramedics, emergency-medical technicians, law-enforcement and correctional officers and active-duty members of the U.S. military and the Florida National Guard. The tuition and fee waivers would apply to family members attending state career centers, state colleges or state universities.

JUSTICES TO HEAR FAMU HAZING CASE IN FEBRUARY
The Florida Supreme Court will hear arguments in February in an appeal by a former member of Florida A&M University's "Marching 100" band who was convicted in the high-profile 2011 death of drum major Robert Champion. The court on Monday issued an order that scheduled oral arguments on Feb. 7. Dante Martin was found guilty of manslaughter, felony hazing resulting in death and two counts of misdemeanor hazing in the death of Champion, who was injured in Orlando during a band ritual known as "crossing Bus C." During the ritual, band members were struck repeatedly as they crossed from the front of a bus to the back, and Martin was "president" of Bus C, according to a 5th District Court of Appeal ruling last year that upheld the convictions. Champion passed out after finishing the crossing and later was pronounced dead at a hospital. Martin's attorney has argued that a state hazing law is unconstitutional, at least in part because it is overly broad. Martin, now 30, was sentenced to 77 months in prison after being found guilty by an Orange County jury.


--END--
11/13/2017

© 2017 The News Service of Florida. All rights reserved. Posting or forwarding this material without permission is prohibited. You can view the Terms of Use on our website.

Independent and Indispensable